What are Unbailable Charges?

Having your bail set as a first-time offender is usually not an issue as most judges will allow a bail amount to be granted. As with anything though, there are always exceptions. Every crime and the situation and circumstances around it are unique. So while most people will be able to have a bail amount set, some offenses or crimes are considered too severe for a judge to allow bail for the defendant. Let’s take a closer look at some of the types of situations where a release before the trial of any sort is not possible.

Murder

Because of the nature of the charge, a defendant who has been charged with murder is often considered a dangerous individual and a possible threat to the community, they will often have no option for release before trial. Often times, factors such as premeditation, self-defense, or accidental death will not have any weight as to if that person is offered bail. Because of how serious this offense is, the defendant will often have to remain incarcerated until the conclusion of their trial.

Terrorism

Similar to murder, terrorism is an offense so serious that there is often no possibility of being bailed out. Again, often similar to murder, the circumstances surrounding the charges do not matter, the extent of the injury, damage, or people involved do not have any weight when determining if bail is possible. Those accused of this crime will most likely remain in jail until the completion of their trial.

Violent Felonies

Serious violent crimes such as armed robbery, rape, and some assault cases can again be determined to be serious enough that the accused is believed to be a threat to the community and bail will not be offered. While this is not a guarantee, most likely those accused of armed robbery and rape charges are considered dangerous and will not be able to leave jail until their trial is completed.

Repeat Offenses While On Bail

Because being released on bail is considered a privilege, if someone is arrested while already out on bail, the chances of rerelease are extremely low. While a judge may take the factors involved into account, most likely the accused will have to remain incarcerated until the end of their trials.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *